5 Job-Hunting Tips for Experienced Meeting Planners

Prepare in advance for questions about being overqualified.
Prepare in advance for questions about being overqualified.

Downsized? Or just looking for a change? How can experienced meeting planners avoid the “overqualified” trap?

Here are a few job-hunting tips for experienced meeting planners:

Avoid the online “black hole”

Your best bet in finding a position is your network. Tap your contacts within your industry, your LinkedIn connections and your friends. Avoid the black hole of submitting online resumes that go nowhere.

Watch your adjectives

The experts at meetingjobs.com suggest trading in terms like “seasoned professional” or “wealth of experience” for specifics on related experience.

Show off your tech skills

Include specifics on the technology you use to appear relevant and up to date in your skills.

Keep it to 15

Meetingjobs.com suggests that you not include your college graduation date on your resume. Don’t list the length of experience in your objective. Consider using a functional resume or a mixture of functional and chronological. Promote your technology knowledge by listing the latest programs. Include your LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter profiles. Also include a VisualCV. It shows you are comfortable with social media.

Prepare for the “overqualified” question

AARP suggests preparing a strategy in advance of your interview to determine how you’ll respond to questions about being overqualified. Proactively explain that your priorities aren’t title or money. Emphasize your attitude, interests, skills and experience that led you to the position. Avoid being defensive, and remember to always have a positive attitude.

 

 

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Barbara Scofidio is editor of Prevue and heads up the Visionary Summits, our exclusive conference series targeting senior-level meeting and incentive planners. In 25 years of covering the industry, her articles have spanned topics ranging from social media to strategic meetings management. She is currently the media liaison for FICP's Education Committee and was the first member of the media ever to be invited to sit on a committee by GBTA, where she spent three years on the Groups and Meetings Committee. She has also been an active member of Site, chairing its Crystal Awards committee and acting as a judge. A familiar face at industry events, Barbara often leads panel discussions or speaks on topics close to her heart, such as green meetings or how the industry can help combat human trafficking. She is also on the board of ECPAT USA, the human trafficking organization. Barbara is based outside Boston, in Groton, Mass.

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